Statues in Copenhagen

Højbro Plads: Bishop Absalon (1128-1201), a cleric of the axe-wielding variety who was until very recently credited with founding Copenhagen.

Equestrian statue of Bishop Absalon

Statue of Eskimo.

A Greenlander with his kayak. The position of the knot at the bottom of his coat is unfortunate.

Bronze of lion and lioness killing a boar.

Our statues tend to be serene and heraldic. Theirs tend to be ripping something apart.

Statue in niche on cafe building in Rosenborg Have. Lurblæserne: Bronze statue on column of men blowing lurs.  They play whenever a virgin passes.  So far, they've been silent.

Statue of Echo in Kongens Have.

Echo (in Kongens Have).

Bronze statues of merman and his sons, underwater.

Look carefully. You'll see that there are bronze statues under the water. They are quite a hazard to boats too.

Bronze statue in Tøjhusmuseet.

This looks so foreign, and yet Denmark is so close.

Bronze statue of girl reading.

[Left] Classically naked girl reading outside a public library. One reason I shot her from this side was that some git had spray painted the other side.

Bronze statue of Valkyrie on horse.

Calmness doesn't seem to be top priority in statuary in Copenhagen. Here we see a valkyrie on a horse. Neither looks happy.

Bronze statue of Valkyrie on horse.

I took me a while to work out what I was looking at. A bull is smashing a sea beast into the ground with its head.

Bronze statue of bull fighting a sea beast in Rådhuspladsen.

Bronze equestrian statue of Danish King.

There once was a very famous man,

On his famous horse he’d ride throughout the land,

The people used to see him everywhere,

And when he died they put a statue in the square.

Here comes the equestrian statue!

Prancing up and down the square.

Little old ladies stop and say, “Well, I declare!”

It’s a sight to bring you joy, you’ll feel so gay,

And it’s guaranteed to brighten up your day,

If it’s grey.

Relief carving of owl on weathered stone.

Just outside the students’ union building is this stone. The photographs of it are deceptive. They suggest falsely that these carvings are quite clear. It took me a while to convince myself that it wasn’t just a very weathered piece of stone, and it was a while before I saw the owl catching the mouse. My guide said that she had walked past it hundreds of times, and had never noticed that it had designs on it.

Owl sculpture in Copenhagen near the Rundetårn.

He's made of sand, but realistic enough to get some money in his hat.


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